Meet Libby!

OverDrive has come out with a brand-new app for library users – Libby! 

It’s got lots of new features:

  • Quick and easy for first time users
  • Integrated reading and listening experience with OverDrive Read and OverDrive Listen
  • No Adobe ID or account registration required
  • Faster performance and powerful search
  • Same experience on all devices
  • Customizable browsing options to find the books you want faster
  • Simplified download settings
  • Fixed-layout and Read-Along eBook support
  • Support for eBook highlights and annotations
  • Custom lists for tagging books you love, want to read and more

Do you need Libby if you’ve already got the OverDrive app? No! You can keep using the OverDrive app if you’re comfortable with it. OverDrive is not planning to stop supporting the OverDrive app – Libby’s just a new option for people who want one.

Can you use both apps? If you want to, sure! Both apps will connect to your library account. However, they will not sync – so progress you make on a book in the OverDrive app won’t show up on the same title in Libby. So it’s probably best to stick with one or the other.

How are they different? Eventually, the only difference between Libby and the OG OverDrive app will be how they operate. Right now, OverDrive has a few more features that are still being incorporated into Libby, such as accessibility, Reading Rooms, Recommend to Library, and multilingual support. If you make regular use of any of those features, stick with OverDrive for now. OverDrive users will be invited in-app to try out Libby later in the year.

Check out the following video to learn more about it, and remember that you can always call your friendly neighborhood reference librarians at (225)231-3750 for help getting started with library databases.

 

Disaster Preparedness

Hurricane season seems to be kicking off a little more energetically than any of us want, so let’s go over some disaster preparedness resources!

  • The National Hurricane Center’s website is a great resource for lists of what to have on hand in a disaster and how to make sure you’re ready for anything. Check it out! (“Snacks” don’t get their own category, but it can’t hurt!)
  • Red Stick Ready, the Facebook page of the Mayor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness, will keep you informed of weather events and local resources as they happen or become available. (Baton Rouge is one of only two cities in Louisiana to be certified “Storm Ready” by the National Weather Service!)
  • The library’s Hurricane Resources infoguide has lots of information on what to do to prepare for a storm, as well as what to do should your home be affected. (Tropical Storm Cindy isn’t a hurricane and is not likely to become one, though – phew!)

Stay safe! Stay dry! We’re open today for all your entertainment and information needs, especially via the Digital Library, which never closes!

Call for Makers!

Hey, Baton Rouge! Remember last year’s Mini Maker Faire? We’re going to do it again on October 21st, and if you craft, build, program, design, cook, or create in any way, we want you to get involved!

This family-friendly event showcases the amazing work of all kinds of makers across the Baton Rouge area and beyond—anyone who is embracing the DIY or DIT (do-it-together!) spirit and wants to share their accomplishments with an appreciative audience.  Exhibits that are interactive or highlight the process of making things are especially desired.

The Call for Makers has officially gone out! Apply today to make something new with us.

Archives of Sexuality & Gender: LGBTQ History Since 1940

June is Pride Month! Why not celebrate with a brief sideways glance at the past?

The Archives of Sexuality & Gender: LGBTQ History Since 1940 draws from collections of primary source material from over 35 countries, including detailed coverage of the AIDS crisis, the rise and progress of LGBTQ rights movements in the US and the UK, and internal records and publications of some of the first gay and lesbian groups. The Archives features interview transcripts, publications by, for, and about the LGBTQ community, personal correspondence between LGBTQ individuals, and photographs of LGBTQ life and events.

It has all the usual search features – perhaps the most interesting for Pride-related reasons is the “Photograph” limiting option in the Advanced Search – but you can also easily search by term frequency. We looked up “Pride” to see how it’s developed over time from a historical standpoint:

The popularity of a term measures the number of times the term is mentioned against the number of documents available for that year. Statistics!

Celebrate the future and remember the past this Pride with the Archives of Sexuality & Gender, available for free with your library card.

A photo of an early Pride march from the archives of the Mattachine Society of New York.